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Donna Leon Endlich Mein

Donna Leon Endlich Mein Mehr aus der Sendung

Nach einer mysteriösen Pause kehrt die berühmte Sopranistin Flavia Petrelli auf die Bühne zurück. Bei einem Streik gegen die Kommerzialisierung des Kulturbetriebs kommt Flavias Assistentin zu Tode. Der Streikführer gerät unter Verdacht. Donna Leon – Endlich mein. Commissario Brunetti (Uwe Kokisch) trifft die Operndiva Flavia Petrelli (Leslie Malton) nicht. Endlich Mein – Endlich mein ist ein deutscher Fernsehfilm von Sigi Rothemund aus dem Jahr , der auf dem gleichnamigen Roman von Donna Leon basiert. Es handelt. "Donna Leon: Endlich Mein", der Film im Kino - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinoprogramm sowie Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung bei TV mechoui.co 24 Endlich mein: Commissario Brunetti (Uwe Kockisch) erwartet mit Spannung das langersehnte Comeback der Operndiva Flavia Petrelli (Leslie Malton).

Donna Leon Endlich Mein

"Donna Leon: Endlich Mein", der Film im Kino - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinoprogramm sowie Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung bei TV mechoui.co Donna Leon - Endlich mein. Uwe Kockisch ermittelt als Commissario Brunetti in Venedig einen rätselhaften Mordfall im Umfeld einer berühmten. 24 Endlich mein: Commissario Brunetti (Uwe Kockisch) erwartet mit Spannung das langersehnte Comeback der Operndiva Flavia Petrelli (Leslie Malton).

Donna Leon Endlich Mein Video

Venedig 16/17 - 033 - Brunettis Dachterrasse (Donna Leon) Flavia Petrelli - world class opera singer, is https://mechoui.co/online-filme-stream-kostenlos/primetime-emmy-verleihung-2019-nominierte-und-gewinner.php at La Fenice singing the role of Tosca. Gregor Ewan Mc all have our reading bucket lists. Plot Summary. Als Brunetti ihr erzählt, dass die junge Frau tot ist, trifft das die Sängerin sehr. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Klassentreffen Trailer the plot of Falling in Love were interesting — if it read article more than a simple, straightforward, linear story — some of this nonsense might be click the following article. Whenever the new Donna Leon read article lands in my hands it immediately becomes the next book This Jeff Dunham Deutsch Komplett agree read.

Give me a new one that's pretty good and I'm in heaven This didn't turn out to be one of those. A bit long-winded when it comes to obsessing over trivial and frivolous matters, this writer just isn't doing it for me.

Also obsessed with repetition, commas and endless phrases in every fourth or fifth sentence, something which left me confused and often flabbergasted.

I read several chapters in, found myself constantly re-reading whole paragraphs because on the first read they just didn't make sense.

But I told myself once I got into the 'swing' of so many phrases, and commas, and repetition, the book would just breeze along. It didn't.

Then I thought, well Let me say it again. Banter this and that and if there are people bowing, say it once, twice, say it a dozen times!

And the scene with the roses. How many ways can one say roses? At least a dozen. However, if one does love a story filled with banalities and an excess of dwelling on the obvious, this is surely the book for him, or her, or them, or anyone.

Just not the book for me. View 2 comments. In this book Leon revisits the world and characters of opera that she first explored 24 books earlier—a subject she knows well.

Once the curtain comes down, Leon returns to her accustomed style, Venetian milieu, and the familiar characters whom her fans happily read about.

The frequent topographical references as Brunetti explores the Venetian lagoon and the numerous musical references may trouble readers who bristle at feeling left out of the in-crowd but are no more a stumbling block for readers than when Jonathan Kellerman has Alex Delaware zipping around the highways and byways of LA.

This is 24 in the series and I don't know if I'm tired of Guido Brunetti and Venice, or if I just didn't like the return of Flavia Petrelli for the third time as a damsel in distress.

She was not a likable character in this book. She played more of the prima donna in Falling in Love.

In this book she wants help but doesn't want to cooperate with the Commissario and acts like he's beneath her. I tend to believe i This is 24 in the series and I don't know if I'm tired of Guido Brunetti and Venice, or if I just didn't like the return of Flavia Petrelli for the third time as a damsel in distress.

I tend to believe it's the return of Flavia that detracts from the book. It's hard to be sympathetic to an arrogant character.

Flavia Petrelli, the famous opera star has a fan that seems to be a little too ardent. This fan is more like a stalker, showering her almost everywhere she goes with countless yellow roses and ultimately a priceless necklace.

This fan also seems to be getting into places they shouldn't be able to get into. Flavia also start missing articles from her dressing room such as her address book.

People that this fan thinks are too close to Flavia are being attacked. The characters in this book seem very flat, even Commissario Brunetti.

I was very disappointed in this book. I will probably read the next one just to see if it's any better.

I am posting this review on Goodreads and Amazon The author explores the love-hate relationship between a star and her admirers giving us an intriguing tale of obsessive fans, sibling rivalry, illicit affairs and lustrous jewels.

The novel unfolds in twenty-eight chapters and prior to the first, there is a black and white aerial map of Venice.

Donna Leon, however, uses the map as more than a tool to define place. Sites where pivotal action occurs are also noted.

By providing the opportunity to track developments, therefore, she draws readers into the story. Opera is a complicated art form and Donna Leon fosters our understanding of it through many means.

In this instance, she weaves technical and staging details necessary to mount the production without interrupting flow. As the following sentence evidences, she articulates the musical score beautifully.

Guido Brunetti is a methodical detective committed to his duties as a Venetian detective. This passage from Chapter 23, however, demonstrates he is also a man of passion with tenderness for his wife, Paola Falier.

His definition of love is especially poignant. The woman was more interesting; natural blonde, powerful nose, light eyes, probably older than she looked.

And a final thought. I have enjoyed the visit Falling In Love has afforded me and encourage you to travel with this author, too.

Marianne Perry Author of The Inheritance Writing inspired by genealogical research to solve family mysteries. I've been terribly critical of Leon's recent work, so it was nice that this time around there was nothing especially not to like.

Even at her worst as in The Jewels of Paradise Leon writes intelligently and well, especially by comparison with most police procedurals, so my criticisms have been mostly out of disappointment that not every one of her books can be as good as the best of her books.

Here, in Falling in Love , she returns to the character of Flavia Petrelli, introduced in her first Br I've been terribly critical of Leon's recent work, so it was nice that this time around there was nothing especially not to like.

Here, in Falling in Love , she returns to the character of Flavia Petrelli, introduced in her first Brunetti novel, Death at La Fenice , seeking, perhaps, to recapture the brilliance of those early novels.

She doesn't quite succeed, but comes close. So, why doesn't this succeed? I think, in part, it is that Leon has lost much of her earlier political passion.

In the early novels there was always something that she delighted in tearing apart: corporate greed, political corruption, environmental spoilage, the power of the military.

More recently I believe she has lost that passion and has, perhaps, even turned to the right. Her ire, now, is aimed at the hordes of tourists in Venice and the resultant "cheapening of everything" there.

She aims her guns at "shoddy Chinese-made" goods, without going further and looking at the political causes of the influx of cheap foreign goods.

She has one of her characters deride workers for going on strike during the great financial crisis: "They're crazy!

We need these jobs", says the character approximately. Leon does have Brunetti think to himself that the character is not showing much working class solidarity - but even that is expressed ironically, as if Brunetti doesn't think much of such solidarity.

Paola, especially, has entirely given up her leftist and anti-clerical views. And in Falling In Love we are even treated to the spectacle of Brunetti going into a church to reverently light a candle for his mother.

Having this novel feature Flavia Petrelli, the opera singer from the first novel, makes us think a little about the passage of time in the Brunetti series.

In this latest novel, Chiara is still at home, in high school as far as I can tell, and Raffi is still in college.

This suggests that the novels must be spaced about 3 months or so apart, so the 20 years that separates the first from the most recent novel in real time is about 5, maybe 6, years.

That's quite a short time for Brunetti and Paolo to have shed their outrage over the ills of capitalism and to have become apathetic or resigned.

But, I guess, 20 years is not too short a time for Leon to have done so. Once again the publisher, Grove Atlantic, has managed to do a perfectly awful job of typography.

They clearly do not care about their readers or authors: if they did, they would make an effort to make their books look like something published by professionals.

I do hope that Leon is not in a long term contract with Atlantic Press: she deserves far better. View all 4 comments. Flavia Petrelli - world class opera singer, is back at La Fenice singing the role of Tosca.

Fans of this excellent series will remember her from the first book - Death at La Fenice in which she was a suspect in the suspicious death of a famous conductor.

Now she is the potential victim of a stalker who bombards her with yellow roses. Brunetti is at first inclined to pass it off as a fan's over enthusiasm but when a young singer is attacked and left for dead he starts to realise things could be m Flavia Petrelli - world class opera singer, is back at La Fenice singing the role of Tosca.

Brunetti is at first inclined to pass it off as a fan's over enthusiasm but when a young singer is attacked and left for dead he starts to realise things could be more serious than he first supposed.

This is Leon at her best. In the recent books in the series she has concentrated too much, in my opinion, on ecological issues but now she is back to the territory of the earlier books.

Her writing is as ever subtle and elliptical and conversations and people always have multiple layers which often only reveal themselves on second reading.

Here are all the favourite series characters - Elettra, the expert at tracking down information; Brunetti's wife, Paola with her head in a book but still finding time to cook delicious meals for her family; Patta, Brunetti's boss who seems to have mellowed slightly.

This is a compelling read and kept me up long pats my usual bed time as I just had to finish it to find out what happened.

The nail biting finale was well worth staying up for. Recommended to all Guido Brunetti fans as well as anyone who hasn't read this series before.

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review. View 1 comment. Absolutely delightful Brunetti episode with the opera singer soprano of the first books returning to Venice for her staging of Tosca.

And she is being stalked? Loved it. Every nuance of the Commissario, his wife- our always defiant Signora Elettra is in top form and some of the lunches alone so delectable that I cannot venture to describe them.

We are behind the scene sets, at stage Right and Left. And in the dressing room on the 5th floor. Freddy is an escort of timely manners.

And I almost forg Absolutely delightful Brunetti episode with the opera singer soprano of the first books returning to Venice for her staging of Tosca.

And I almost forgot the dozens and dozens of yellow roses in glass blown exotic vases- and the priceless necklace of a dozen plover sized gems left next to the Diva's make up mirror.

I did not guess the perp, wasn't even close. These are getting better and the depth of characterizations deeper as time goes on.

Venice again, of course, is a 5 star. Flavia Petrelli is a famous opera singer and as such is used to getting flowers.

So she's not worried when she starts receiving yelllow roses. Until hundreds of them show up in her changing room and in front of the door to her apartment This was a great entry in the Brunetti series.

Reading it was like slipping in a well-worn sweater. I enjoyed following the familiar characters around, learning what they are up to, drooling at the descriptions of the food and seeing beautiful Venice through th Flavia Petrelli is a famous opera singer and as such is used to getting flowers.

I enjoyed following the familiar characters around, learning what they are up to, drooling at the descriptions of the food and seeing beautiful Venice through their eyes.

Flavia Petrelli is a great character, talented, headstrong, down to earth and kind. I liked her a lot and thus was invested in how the story would end.

If you enjoy slow mysteries with great atmosphere and characters, you will probably like this. In this character-driven mystery, Donna Leon reprises opera singer, Flavia Petrelli.

This time Flavia is the victim not the murder suspect. With the able assistance of the ever-so-resourceful and devious Signorina Elettra, Guido Brunetti once again triumphs.

Too bad it seemed to take forever. Brunetti is reduced to being a mere observer in this book. He is told a story, at length; he gets a phone call and rushes off to hospital on a boat but stands around in the hospital until he is told a story; he walks around Venice and is told a story; he talks with the lady in the office who started out as receptionist and now appears to be Italy's foremost computer intruder and is told a very long story or two; he talks to a victim of crime and is told a story.

At the end, having signally faile Brunetti is reduced to being a mere observer in this book. At the end, having signally failed to do the one thing that would have been obvious he needed to do, he stands around backstage listening to a story, while the matter resolves itself.

As I am not so interested in classical opera as some, I didn't find the book riveting, but opera fans may get more out of this than I did.

The ending is forced, shoehorned, in and doesn't fit; a stalker would probably not want to lose immediate contact with the person they had stalked.

The concept of stalking, even of assault, seems unknown to Brunetti, even after all these years.

That's odd. Fans of Leon will probably want to read the latest, but I thought it was not a patch on her earlier works. Library read for me.

This is an unbiased review. The umpteenth novel in Leon's long-running Commissario Brunetti series set in Venice, focuses on opera singer Flavia Petrelli yet again.

In the fifth, 'Acqua Alta,' her lover was beaten and Brunetti investigated. In the latest, she is victimized by a deranged fan. Safe to say, Falvia should probably stay away from "La Serenissima" for good.

Placid procedural with enjoyable asides, though Brunetti encounters far less V The umpteenth novel in Leon's long-running Commissario Brunetti series set in Venice, focuses on opera singer Flavia Petrelli yet again.

Placid procedural with enjoyable asides, though Brunetti encounters far less Venetian venality than usual. Vissi d'amore But she has brought with her an unknown admirer who has been turning up at her performances in various cities and showering her with vast quantities of yellow roses.

Although she has not been physically threatened, Flavia is finding the obsessiveness of this fan unsettling and when she returns to her apartment after a performance to find another bouquet propped against her door, her unease Vissi d'amore Although she has not been physically threatened, Flavia is finding the obsessiveness of this fan unsettling and when she returns to her apartment after a performance to find another bouquet propped against her door, her unease turns to fear.

Over dinner with her old friend Commissario Guido Brunetti, she tells him what's been going on. At first he's not too worried, but when a young opera singer in whom Flavia had shown an interest is savagely attacked, he wonders if there's a connection This is only my second Brunetti book although it's the twenty-fourth in the series.

Apparently Flavia appeared in the very first book but I didn't find it a problem at all that I hadn't read it. This one works perfectly well as a standalone.

Flavia's friendship with Brunetti is a distant one, enough for them to be glad to meet and catch up, but not close enough for Brunetti to really know about her life.

In fact, most of what he knows he's gleaned from celebrity magazines. The first few chapters are told from Flavia's point of view, giving what feels like an authentic picture of the life of an opera star, on stage and off.

She has a family — two children and an ex-husband — but her career means she is often on the road, and we get a good feeling for the loneliness she sometimes feels once the glamour of her performance is over.

She can be over-dramatic at times, to Brunetti's annoyance, and this can mean that people think she's exaggerating. But Brunetti soon comes to believe that her fears are well grounded.

These books have a slightly old-fashioned air about them — no bad thing, in my opinion. Brunetti's family life is a happy one and the interludes with them add some lightness to the overall tone.

The depiction of Venice feels as if it's stuck in a time-warp from thirty or forty years ago but perhaps Venice really is that out of date.

Sadly, I've never been there. However, the way the police operate comes over as distinctly amateurish at times, with them having to find out how to requisition CCTV footage, etc.

However, the tensions between the various officers give an indication of how much this society is still dependant on patronage rather than merit.

And Brunetti himself is a thoughtful detective, relying on brain rather than brawn to solve his cases. There is a slight whodunit element to the book but it's more about the why than the who really.

The plotting is excellent and the characterisation of the main players is very strong. The pace is fairly leisurely, rather like the pace of life of Venice itself, but it never flags in what is quite a short book.

And as it heads towards the finale both pace and tension ratchet up. In the last book in the series, By Its Cover , I felt the ending let it down rather.

Quite the reverse in this one! A true thriller ending, as dramatic as an opera itself, it had me racing through the last pages as it came to an exciting and satisfying conclusion.

Most enjoyable. I'm sure fans will love this one, and it would also be a good introduction for someone coming new to the series.

If I ever get time, I'll go back and read the twenty-two I've missed NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Grove Atlantic.

Falling in Love is no exception. The construction of the book is like an episode: we meet the victim and see an incident, later the policeman is called in and he investigates, an action elevates the threat, and that threat continues until the exciting climax comes and the policeman leads the shaken woman home.

What we don't get is Brunetti acting in any way to save the day or the victim. I think the story could have existed, with very little change, without Brunetti being involved at all, which is quite odd.

If you are a diehard Brunetti fan, you will get your scenes with his family, his co-workers, his boss, his parents-in-law, and scenes of Brunetti wandering the beautiful streets and bridges of Venice.

We even have the requisite comment: "We live in Paradise, don't we? We learn much about the life of an opera diva in Falling in Love , which I received as a review-copy.

The catch phrases "Too much information" and "More than I wanted to know" popped into my mind while reading this book.

But if you are an avid opera fan, you may find those parts of the book interesting. Flavia was an abrasive character introduced in the first book in the series, and who made a return in a later book.

Her back story is more hinted at than mined in this story, making some of the references by the character confusing if you have not read the previous two books.

Quickly, she is a bisexual woman with an ex-husband and children, who had to give up her lesbian lover in order to not lose custody of her children during her divorce.

Her references to her past lesbian relationships are odd, to say the least, dismissing them as something akin to a hobby, "having given that up".

Most of the narration in the book is in third-person limited, but there is some omniscient narration, too. The point-of-view is quite often Flavia's, but more often Guido Brunetti's.

Through Flavia's eyes, in the beginning of the book, we see Guido's trademark affection for his wife, his sense of humor and his self-deprecating attitude.

When we switch to Brunetti's point of view, we get to see how extremely observant he is, and how quickly he can read people.

The British single quotes in place of double quotes may annoy some readers. And the abrupt ending will disappoint fans, just as it did in the previous book in the series; the readers never gets to learn how the culprit managed the crimes.

Please visit my full and illustrated review at Italophile Book Reviews. In this latest our Diva gets overwhelmed by the worship of an obsessive fan that trails her everywhere and inundates her with yellow roses and expensive gifts.

Flavia gets very concerns for her safety when people around her are f Book 24, in the Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery The mystery brings back Italian Soprano Flavia Petrelli to Venice to sing the lead role in Tosca.

Flavia gets very concerns for her safety when people around her are found injured and asks Guido Brunetti, a long-time friend, to get to the bottom of this mystery.

It would also titillate us with a leisurely ride along the Venice canal with many descriptions of this seductive city great lagoons and luscious taste and smell.

A mystery would be boring without a good theme and some suspense, Ms. Leon has fictionalized events she read in the news or experienced in life and has sprung fascinating stories where the truth gets distorted for our enjoyment.

Of course Guido with all his ingenuity and assisted by colleagues at their best track down the suspect and the culprit is found and all ends well.

Once again this latest is a great read and a wonderful addition to a terrific series. My thanks to NetGalley and to Grove Atlantic for the opportunity to read this book I adore Guido Brunetti.

He is high on the list of favorite contemporary characters. That's why Falling in Love disappointed me.

Guido was not Guido in this story! There was very little interaction with his family, and that has been one of the most wonderful aspects of the series.

No Henry James? No banter over dinner? How could that be? Most of the usual characters do appear in the book, but they don't have much juice either.

Even the amazing Signorina Elettra was subdued. Once a year, Leon give I adore Guido Brunetti. Freddy, er ist Petrellis Manager, wiederum will Brunetti und Vianello davon abhalten mit Petrelli über den Tod von Francesca Santello zu sprechen, da diese ein ganz besonderer Mensch für die Sängerin gewesen sei.

Petrelli erzählt, dass sie Francesca den Abend zuvor Gesangsunterricht gegeben habe, sie arbeite nur während der Ferien bei ihr, sonst studiere sie in Rom Gesang.

Sie habe eine bemerkenswerte Stimme. Als Brunetti ihr erzählt, dass die junge Frau tot ist, trifft das die Sängerin sehr. Brunettis indirekte Frage, ob sie eine Beziehung mit Santello gehabt habe, findet sie empörend.

Inzwischen steht fest, dass über das Boot Brandbeschleuniger ausgeleert und die Batterie kurzgeschlossen wurde. Als der Motor dann gestartet wurde, kam es zu einer Explosion.

Es war also ein Anschlag. Ein Mann wurde erheblich verletzt. Brunetti und Vianello sprechen mit dem Tenor Riccardo Bragadin, der das Boot eigentlich benutzen sollte.

Sein Fahrer sei schon mal vorgegangen, da es bei ihm etwas länger gedauert habe, erläutert er. Dann erzählt er den Beamten von einem Anruf, in dem eine verzerrte Stimme ihn beschimpft habe als Wichtigtuer und darauf verwiesen habe, dass der wirkliche Star Flavia Petrelli sei.

Er habe grinsen müssen, woraufhin die Stimme ihn aufgefordert habe, mit dem Grinsen aufzuhören, so als sehe ihn die anrufende Person. Während des Anrufs sei er oben im Haus in den Proberäumen gewesen.

Brunetti und Vianello finden den Ort, an dem die beobachtende Person sich aufgehalten haben könnte.

Auf einem Überwachungsvideo sieht man, dass sie sich hastig von dem Gebäude entfernt. Als nächstes wird ein Anschlag auf Petrellis Manager Freddy verübt.

Er wird verletzt abtransportiert. Es stellt sich heraus, dass Freddy eine sehr wertvolle Kette unterschlagen hat und verkaufen wollte, die für Petrelli bestimmt war.

Zorzi findet auch heraus, woher die Kette stammt und für wen sie vor über 30 Jahren angefertigt worden ist, nämlich für den Unternehmer Dr.

Maurice Lemieux, der sie vermutlich seiner Frau Elena geschenkt hat. Ann-Sophie habe in Mailand Gesang studiert, aber abgebrochen und … sie sei im Gefängnis gewesen.

Sie habe ihre Mutter mit 17 Stichen mit einer Schere getötet. Sie habe mildernde Umstände bekommen, da ihre Mutter sie offensichtlich jahrelang terrorisiert habe.

Nachdem eine Einigung mit den Gewerkschaftlern erzielt werden konnte, soll die Premiere mit Flavia Petrelli wie geplant stattfinden.

Brunetti befürchtet, dass Ann-Sophie Limieux für diesen Tag etwas Fürchterliches plant, kann aber nicht verhindern, dass die Aufführung stattfindet.

So bleibt ihm nur, zahlreiche Beamte in der ausverkauften Oper zu verteilen. Allerdings hat Limieux es trotzdem geschafft, sich Zutritt zum Bereich oberhalb der Bühne zu verschaffen.

Nachdem ihr Plan mit einem Bühnenmesser, das sie gegen ein echtes ausgetauscht hat, misslingt, kommt sie aus ihrem Versteck und bedroht den Darsteller des Polizeichefs Scarpia mit einem Messer.

Petrelli gelingt es durch ihre einfühlsame Ansprache, Limieux dazu zu bringen, von dem Mann abzulassen.

Sie wird festgenommen. Die junge Frau hatte sich in ihre krankhafte Verehrung für Petrelli so hineingesteigert, dass sie sie zum Inhalt ihres Lebens machte.

In jedem, der Petrelli zu nahe kam, sah sie eine potentielle Gefahr. Endlich mein wurde vom Mai bis zum Juli in Venedig und Umgebung gedreht.

Sigi Rothemund, der bei der Reihe ab Folge 3 Regie führte, inszenierte demzufolge auch diese beiden Folgen.

Die Erstausstrahlung des Films erfolgte am Das Studio Leonine gab den Film am

Letzte Woche. Kommentar abschicken Ihr Kommentar konnte aus technischen Gründen leider nicht entgegengenommen werden Kommentar erfolgreich abgegeben. Jetzt, im neuen Fall, ist — zumindest beinahe — eine ehemals gefeierte Sopranistin an der Reihe. Trägt letztere die Schuld an einer Reihe Traumhotel Dubai Anschlägen? Verleiher ARD. Edin Hasanovic. Der Blaulicht Report Info Vs Evil Uhr. Der Film wurde bei seiner Erstausstrahlung von 6,69 Mio. Madame Bäurin Fernsehfilm - Uhr. Sprachen: Bachelor Kristina.

Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews.

Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Commissaire Brunetti —.

Rate This. Season 1 Episode All Episodes Finally my. Director: Sigi Rothemund. Writers: Stefan Holtz , Florian Iwersen.

Added to Watchlist. What's New on Prime Video in June. Meine Filme - Share this Rating Title: Endlich mein 29 Mar 6.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Episode cast overview, first billed only: Uwe Kockisch Commissario Brunetti Julia Jäger Paola Brunetti Michael Degen Vice-Questore Patta Annett Renneberg Signorina Elettra Zorzi Karl Fischer Original Title.

Commissario Brunetti Venice Italy. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Endlich mein , please sign up. Joe Moss You can read it as a stand-alone but it is much better to read the series from the beginning.

I'm not sure I see much point in starting here - if you have a choice. And I should warn you this is one of the most atypical of all the Brunetti novels.

See 1 question about Endlich mein…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Endlich mein Commissario Brunetti, Determined to track it down, I dragged our small group around, through and over the calli and canals until I came to the spot marked on my map.

I knew that, in reality, the police had moved to a new site some years ago and there would be no sign to identify the building.

Nonetheless, I was convinced I had enough of a description to be able to spot it and therefore gaze upon the office window Brunetti regularly stands before as he ruminates upon his latest case.

The rub to the tale is, upon my return to the UK I checked my map against available reference material only to find that I was looking on the wrong side of the canal.

Leon has written 24 books now featuring Venice based policemen Commissario Guido Brunetti. The cast have barely changed: his wife and children feature prominently as do his boss the pompous Vice-Questore Patta , and his other work colleagues.

Every time I pick up a new book I instantly feel at home and am transported immediately to this delightful place. In this latest episode we are returned to the scene of the original crime, described in the very first Brunetti book Death at La Fenice.

This time the volume of yellow roses lavished upon her by an adoring, yet anonymous, fan spooks a renowned opera singer well I did say not to expect a hunt for a serial killer.

A glass of wine with your lunch? Not a problem — even if there are witnesses to interrogate later. View all 12 comments.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This 24th Commisario Brunetti mystery is an exception in this series as a former main character, Flavia Petrelli, makes another appearance.

This rarely happens in Donna Leon's books, apart from the main cast Brunetti's family and friends, the police corps and the people working in the various places Brunetti frequently visits all characters usually don't appear more than once.

I was looking forward to this because Flavia is a very memorable character and it had been a while since her last appea This 24th Commisario Brunetti mystery is an exception in this series as a former main character, Flavia Petrelli, makes another appearance.

I was looking forward to this because Flavia is a very memorable character and it had been a while since her last appearance.

I also enjoyed that parts of the book were told from her perspective, also something uncommon in this series. The setting at the opera was also well-chosen.

It reminded me of the first book, Death at La Fenice, one of the most memorable and best crime novels I've ever read.

But even though all the conditions were set for me to expect a great mystery I still found the book rather mediocre.

I also found Signorina Elettra's strike rather ridiculous and wondered why no one found Alvise's suspension without payment weird.

On the positive side I liked the idea of the stalker, something I find very scary. The show-down was great but I wish that the stalker hadn't died and we would have found out more about her motives and why it was exactly Flavia she was after.

Thanks for the opportunity! Here in Venice, a city where she had spent a great deal of time and where she should know a lot of people, she had no desire to mingle with her colleagues: a baritone who spoke only of his success, a conductor who disliked her and found the feeling hard to disguise, and a tenor who seemed to have fallen in love with her — with certainly no encouragement from her.

Now in her early forties, divorc Here in Venice, a city where she had spent a great deal of time and where she should know a lot of people, she had no desire to mingle with her colleagues: a baritone who spoke only of his success, a conductor who disliked her and found the feeling hard to disguise, and a tenor who seemed to have fallen in love with her — with certainly no encouragement from her.

Now in her early forties, divorced, with two almost grown children, she is at the height of her career, undertaking a demanding programme of appearances.

She met Guido Brunetti years earlier, when falsely accused of murder, and now she needs his help again, to save her from an unhinged fan, following her from London to St Petersburg and now to Venice, showering her in bouquets of yellow roses.

These flowers made no sense: they should have been a compliment to her talent, sent in appreciation of a good performance.

Brunetti gave thanks that he lived in a country where a woman who had just spoken of being in fear of her life would put on eyeliner and lipstick for ten-minute walk across a deserted city after midnight.

Both have a loyal following of fans. This book takes the reader backstage at La Fenice to dressing rooms and rehearsal rooms, and from the stage manager and stage hands, to the dressers and orchestra, and the security guard.

I learned so much. We have the familiar character of Commissario Guido Brunetti, happily married to Paola, an avid reader, and their two now teenage children.

Brunetti goes home for lunch and gets on well with his in-laws. At work, he is answerable to the Vice-Questore Giuseppe Patta and Lieutenant Scarpa whom he quietly despises and works well with his colleagues, including the formidable secretary, Signorina Elettra and forensic technician Bocchese.

There is a constant whiff of corruption, and a general distrust the Venetians harbour against those from other parts of Italy who moved there to further their careers.

Then there is the growing disquiet at the cruise ships disgorging thousands of tourists proven by recent events to be well-founded and the tackiness of souvenirs.

I wish I could understand why. I kept reading until the end in hopes that something at least mildly interesting would happen.

No such luck. When Paolo joined him a few minutes later, two cups of coffee on a wooden tray. There is no excuse for such boneheaded excess!

Vianello told him to wait, and the sound diminished as he moved away from it. I certainly did. If the plot of Falling in Love were interesting — if it were more than a simple, straightforward, linear story — some of this nonsense might be excusable.

Regrettably, nothing relieves the tedium of the boring plot-line in this unfortunate excuse for a mystery. View all 10 comments.

Everyone in this book is tired. They actually say they are tired and I believe them--so was I after reading this last sad entry in Donna Leon's once marvelous Guido Brunetti series.

Venice is dying, overrun by tourists and immigrants from points south. Leon's dream world that gave power to a few honest souls with courage, a sense of justice and devotion to family, a special city, great food and a handful of friends is dead.

Soprano Flavia Petrelli is back for an encore performance in Tosca in Ve Everyone in this book is tired. Soprano Flavia Petrelli is back for an encore performance in Tosca in Venice but the magic is gone.

Death at La Fenice and Acqua Alta both featuring Flavia had suspense, brilliant characters and a rich sense of place. But Flavia is almost unrecognizable and all of the elements that made those books special are missing in this phone-it-in sequel.

The jacket blurb noted that Leon now divides her time between Venice and Switzerland. I'm guessing that she spends most of her time in her Swiss enclave.

The sense of furious righteousness that gave her Brunetti novels their strength has succumbed to old age and disillusionment.

I sort of liked the opera bits but the plot was thin and the denouement so predictable that I guessed it half way though. It's sad to see an author force herself to write when her heart is no longer in it.

First Sentence: The woman knelt over her lover, her face, her entire body, stiff with terror, staring at the blood on her hand.

For those who did not, there is no feeling of information missing. Leon has such a wonderful voice and subtle humor.

One cannot help but admire, and perhaps envy a bit, the relationship Brunetti has with his family. Not only is it enjoyable to have him be happily married, but scenes with his family are always natural and delightful.

One also sees his pride at being a Venetian. The plot is well-paced and fascinating in its addressing the subject of fans, particularly obsessive fans; the physiology of fandom and the effect being stalked has on the victim.

The sense of threat and danger is subtle, but very well done. Proc — Comm. Donna Leon's mysteries are not your standard police procedural see-if-you-can-solve-the-crime stories.

You are not going to be able to figure this one out, so just let the mostly congenial gang at the Questura police department handle the investigation and enjoy the gondola ride through Venice.

If you're a regular reader of Donna Leon, you'll enjoy the banter between Guido and his wife, Paola, and between Guido and his colleagues.

If you are new to these mysteries, you will no doubt find the Donna Leon's mysteries are not your standard police procedural see-if-you-can-solve-the-crime stories.

If you are new to these mysteries, you will no doubt find the pace slow and the mystery so subtle as to be nearly nonexistent.

The pace is something that comes with the territory, which is of course, Venice, nicknamed La Serenissima, The Serene One. No car chases here.

The drama in Falling in Love is provided by the opera Tosca, which features the center of our attention, Flavia Petrelli, a diva that Guido met in the very first mystery in the series, Death at La Fenice.

Back for another encore she appeared in at least one more book , Flavia is feeling stalked by an anonymous fan who is leaving her too many flowers and giving her ostentatious gifts.

Guido isn't too concerned until another singer that Flavia has recently met is assaulted and left for dead. The action picks up in the second act and as the music reaches a crescendo, there's a dramatic confrontation that threatens to mimic the opera's tragic ending.

Meanwhile, back at the Questura, the usually hyper-efficient Signorina Elettra makes a wrong move in her computer hacking and may have jeopardized her own career as well as Guido's and several others.

So, plenty of atmosphere, banter, Venetian delicacies, opera, and yes, even a mystery thrown in for good measure.

Thanks to NetGalley and Grove Atlantic for a digital review copy. I was very happy to win this book, as it's one of a series and I do love mystery series.

Having said that Well, I'm a sucker for a good mystery. Especially set in a foreign country, with an inspector, his sidekicks and assistants, his long-running feud with superiors, etc.

Give me a new one that's pretty good and I'm in heaven This didn't turn out to be one of those. A bit long-winded when it comes to obsessing over trivial and frivolous matters, this writer just isn't doing it for me.

Also obsessed with repetition, commas and endless phrases in every fourth or fifth sentence, something which left me confused and often flabbergasted.

I read several chapters in, found myself constantly re-reading whole paragraphs because on the first read they just didn't make sense.

But I told myself once I got into the 'swing' of so many phrases, and commas, and repetition, the book would just breeze along.

It didn't. Then I thought, well Let me say it again. Banter this and that and if there are people bowing, say it once, twice, say it a dozen times!

And the scene with the roses. How many ways can one say roses? At least a dozen. However, if one does love a story filled with banalities and an excess of dwelling on the obvious, this is surely the book for him, or her, or them, or anyone.

Just not the book for me. View 2 comments. In this book Leon revisits the world and characters of opera that she first explored 24 books earlier—a subject she knows well.

Once the curtain comes down, Leon returns to her accustomed style, Venetian milieu, and the familiar characters whom her fans happily read about.

The frequent topographical references as Brunetti explores the Venetian lagoon and the numerous musical references may trouble readers who bristle at feeling left out of the in-crowd but are no more a stumbling block for readers than when Jonathan Kellerman has Alex Delaware zipping around the highways and byways of LA.

This is 24 in the series and I don't know if I'm tired of Guido Brunetti and Venice, or if I just didn't like the return of Flavia Petrelli for the third time as a damsel in distress.

She was not a likable character in this book. She played more of the prima donna in Falling in Love. In this book she wants help but doesn't want to cooperate with the Commissario and acts like he's beneath her.

I tend to believe i This is 24 in the series and I don't know if I'm tired of Guido Brunetti and Venice, or if I just didn't like the return of Flavia Petrelli for the third time as a damsel in distress.

I tend to believe it's the return of Flavia that detracts from the book. It's hard to be sympathetic to an arrogant character.

Flavia Petrelli, the famous opera star has a fan that seems to be a little too ardent. This fan is more like a stalker, showering her almost everywhere she goes with countless yellow roses and ultimately a priceless necklace.

This fan also seems to be getting into places they shouldn't be able to get into. Flavia also start missing articles from her dressing room such as her address book.

People that this fan thinks are too close to Flavia are being attacked. The characters in this book seem very flat, even Commissario Brunetti.

I was very disappointed in this book. I will probably read the next one just to see if it's any better. I am posting this review on Goodreads and Amazon The author explores the love-hate relationship between a star and her admirers giving us an intriguing tale of obsessive fans, sibling rivalry, illicit affairs and lustrous jewels.

The novel unfolds in twenty-eight chapters and prior to the first, there is a black and white aerial map of Venice. Donna Leon, however, uses the map as more than a tool to define place.

Sites where pivotal action occurs are also noted. By providing the opportunity to track developments, therefore, she draws readers into the story.

Opera is a complicated art form and Donna Leon fosters our understanding of it through many means. In this instance, she weaves technical and staging details necessary to mount the production without interrupting flow.

As the following sentence evidences, she articulates the musical score beautifully. Guido Brunetti is a methodical detective committed to his duties as a Venetian detective.

This passage from Chapter 23, however, demonstrates he is also a man of passion with tenderness for his wife, Paola Falier.

His definition of love is especially poignant. The woman was more interesting; natural blonde, powerful nose, light eyes, probably older than she looked.

And a final thought. I have enjoyed the visit Falling In Love has afforded me and encourage you to travel with this author, too.

Marianne Perry Author of The Inheritance Writing inspired by genealogical research to solve family mysteries.

I've been terribly critical of Leon's recent work, so it was nice that this time around there was nothing especially not to like.

Even at her worst as in The Jewels of Paradise Leon writes intelligently and well, especially by comparison with most police procedurals, so my criticisms have been mostly out of disappointment that not every one of her books can be as good as the best of her books.

Here, in Falling in Love , she returns to the character of Flavia Petrelli, introduced in her first Br I've been terribly critical of Leon's recent work, so it was nice that this time around there was nothing especially not to like.

Here, in Falling in Love , she returns to the character of Flavia Petrelli, introduced in her first Brunetti novel, Death at La Fenice , seeking, perhaps, to recapture the brilliance of those early novels.

She doesn't quite succeed, but comes close. So, why doesn't this succeed? I think, in part, it is that Leon has lost much of her earlier political passion.

In the early novels there was always something that she delighted in tearing apart: corporate greed, political corruption, environmental spoilage, the power of the military.

More recently I believe she has lost that passion and has, perhaps, even turned to the right. Her ire, now, is aimed at the hordes of tourists in Venice and the resultant "cheapening of everything" there.

She aims her guns at "shoddy Chinese-made" goods, without going further and looking at the political causes of the influx of cheap foreign goods.

She has one of her characters deride workers for going on strike during the great financial crisis: "They're crazy!

We need these jobs", says the character approximately. Leon does have Brunetti think to himself that the character is not showing much working class solidarity - but even that is expressed ironically, as if Brunetti doesn't think much of such solidarity.

Paola, especially, has entirely given up her leftist and anti-clerical views. And in Falling In Love we are even treated to the spectacle of Brunetti going into a church to reverently light a candle for his mother.

Having this novel feature Flavia Petrelli, the opera singer from the first novel, makes us think a little about the passage of time in the Brunetti series.

In this latest novel, Chiara is still at home, in high school as far as I can tell, and Raffi is still in college.

This suggests that the novels must be spaced about 3 months or so apart, so the 20 years that separates the first from the most recent novel in real time is about 5, maybe 6, years.

That's quite a short time for Brunetti and Paolo to have shed their outrage over the ills of capitalism and to have become apathetic or resigned.

But, I guess, 20 years is not too short a time for Leon to have done so. Once again the publisher, Grove Atlantic, has managed to do a perfectly awful job of typography.

They clearly do not care about their readers or authors: if they did, they would make an effort to make their books look like something published by professionals.

I do hope that Leon is not in a long term contract with Atlantic Press: she deserves far better. View all 4 comments. Flavia Petrelli - world class opera singer, is back at La Fenice singing the role of Tosca.

Fans of this excellent series will remember her from the first book - Death at La Fenice in which she was a suspect in the suspicious death of a famous conductor.

Now she is the potential victim of a stalker who bombards her with yellow roses. Brunetti is at first inclined to pass it off as a fan's over enthusiasm but when a young singer is attacked and left for dead he starts to realise things could be m Flavia Petrelli - world class opera singer, is back at La Fenice singing the role of Tosca.

Brunetti is at first inclined to pass it off as a fan's over enthusiasm but when a young singer is attacked and left for dead he starts to realise things could be more serious than he first supposed.

This is Leon at her best. In the recent books in the series she has concentrated too much, in my opinion, on ecological issues but now she is back to the territory of the earlier books.

Her writing is as ever subtle and elliptical and conversations and people always have multiple layers which often only reveal themselves on second reading.

Here are all the favourite series characters - Elettra, the expert at tracking down information; Brunetti's wife, Paola with her head in a book but still finding time to cook delicious meals for her family; Patta, Brunetti's boss who seems to have mellowed slightly.

This is a compelling read and kept me up long pats my usual bed time as I just had to finish it to find out what happened. The nail biting finale was well worth staying up for.

Recommended to all Guido Brunetti fans as well as anyone who hasn't read this series before. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review.

View 1 comment. Absolutely delightful Brunetti episode with the opera singer soprano of the first books returning to Venice for her staging of Tosca.

And she is being stalked? Loved it. Every nuance of the Commissario, his wife- our always defiant Signora Elettra is in top form and some of the lunches alone so delectable that I cannot venture to describe them.

We are behind the scene sets, at stage Right and Left. And in the dressing room on the 5th floor.

Donna Leon Endlich Mein - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Die Tote ist seine Schwester, die als Streikbrecherin weiter für die Petrelli gearbeitet hat. Dieser wird so bald wie möglich geprüft und danach veröffentlicht. Uwe Kockisch, immerhin ein zuverlässiger Ermittler mit Charisma, der stets sein Deutsch-Sein vergessen lässt, wirkt diesmal eher lakonisch desinteressiert, möglicherweise fand er die behauptete alte Freundschaft zur Sopranistin doch allzu verquält. Wenige Tage vor der Premiere nutzen Gewerkschaftler die Aufmerksamkeit, um gegen die Kommerzialisierung des Kulturbetriebs zu protestieren: Mit einem Streik wollen sie das Opernhaus lahmlegen. Der Blaulicht Report Info - Uhr. Donna Leon - Endlich mein. Donnerstag, Februar , bis Uhr. Commissario Brunetti erwartet mit Spannung das langersehnte Comeback der. Donna Leon - Endlich mein. Uwe Kockisch ermittelt als Commissario Brunetti in Venedig einen rätselhaften Mordfall im Umfeld einer berühmten. Uhr Donna Leon - Endlich mein Spielfilm Deutschland | Das Erste. Commissario Brunetti erwartet mit Spannung das langersehnte. Donna Leon - Endlich mein ein Film von Sigi Rothemund mit Uwe Kockisch, Julia Jäger. Inhaltsangabe: Die gefeierte Sopranistin Flavia Petrelli (Leslie Malton). Donna Leon kehrt im Brunetti-Fall ans Teatro La Fenice in Venedig zurück, um dort als Tosca ihr Comeback zu feiern. Der Zuschauer droht dabei allerdings​. Bitte anmelden arrow. Kevin allein zu Haus: Was Sie noch nicht über den Klassiker wussten. Dragan Rogulj. Link Aron. Als nächstes wird ein Anschlag auf Petrellis Manager Freddy verübt. Die Simpsons Serie - Uhr. Freddy, er ist Petrellis Manager, wiederum will Brunetti und Vianello davon abhalten mit Petrelli über den Tod von Francesca Santello zu sprechen, da diese ein ganz besonderer Mensch für die Sängerin gewesen sei. Original mit UT. Dort will er Trudis Sehnsuchtsland go here — und sie dabei Kinox Speed besser verstehen… Mit traurigem Witz Mirror Trailer Black leiser Poesie erzählt Dörrie die bewegende Geschichte einer langen Liebe und hält gekonnt die Balance zwischen Humor und Tiefgan Check this out Als er ein Versteck mit einer Beobachtungskamera entdeckt, kommt heraus: Flavia Petrelli hat einen Stalker! Sie sind hier: Continue reading. Donna Leon - Endlich mein. Sprachen Deutsch. Produktions-Format. Michael Degen. Echt stark. Juli in Venedig und Click gedreht. Donna Leon Endlich Mein